Information About  lLcc

 Information About  lLcc

Atascadero City Hall, Preserving the Heart and Soul of the City

Image result for atascadero city hall

Relive the original planning, designing, constructing and finally restoring of the Atascadero City Hall, a magnificent building that gives Atascadero its identity.  

 

A private tour led by the Atascadero Historical Society will guide you through areas of the building normally closed to the public to learn of the surprisingly diverse occupants through the years.

 

Constructed between 1914 and 1918, the city hall sustained devastating damage in the 2003 San Simeon earthquake only to be painstakingly restored to its original grandeur by a crew that proudly worked together restoring the original excellence of the structure.  

 

You will also be guided past historical garden statues to the Colony House nearby to learn more about Atascadero's unique history.

 

Your tour will be led by a docent who is a trained volunteer dedicated to preserving the history of Atascadero.

 

Tuesday, January 24 2017, 10:00am- 11:30am   Atascadero City Hall 

register for this course: Tour of Atascadero City Hall

Great Decisions 2017 -- Moral Philosophy -- Paul Worsham

 

 

 

 Great Discussions 2017 is a highly participatory course designed for those informed and thoughtful people among us who love to engage in real discussion and respectful debate over issues of the day. This course is a forum for exchanging ideas about international and domestic public affairs and America's place in the world.

 

This one-session course is the first of three sessions of Great Discussions 2017 that will be offered in January, February and March.   LLCC offers this discussion series often. The topics discussed change during the year to coincide with world and domestic events and the interests of the participants.

 

Participants will discuss current international and domestic issues and events and geo-political trends that affect us as citizens of the world and as Americans.  Participation is limited to 28.  You may register for this course each time that it is announced during the year.

 

Great Discussions is modeled after the Foreign Policy Association's Great Decisions program that LLCC offered in the past. 

 

This course is designed to be responsive and flexible to the issues of the world.  Discussions will be active responses to changing circumstances throughout the world. The topic covered during this session of Great Discussions will be moral philosophy a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.  The subjects will be “What Is a Moral Compass?” “The Moral Roots of Liberals and Conservatives” and “Acting On Moral Imperatives.”

 

Joining us at the first class will be Cal Poly Philosophy Professor Tal Scriven to help us discuss “What Is a Moral Compass?” Prof. Scrivien is the chairman of Cal Poly's Philosophy Department and is the author of the recent book Wrongness, Wisdom and WildernessToward a Libertarian Theory of Ethics and the Environment.

 

The participants will discuss how to define and apply a Moral Compass in a philosophical way rather than a religious way.  Inevitably this discussion must include the writings of 18th Century philosopher Immanuel Kant, who said that “the human mind creates the structure of human experience” and that “reason is the source of morality.”  One immediate and practical use for this philosophical discussion will be to start to answer the nagging question many of are asking ourselves: “What does our moral compass tell us that we should do in response to the recent election?”

 

Thursday, January 19 2017, 10:00am- 12:00pm   Union Bank SLO.  

register for this course: Great Discussions - Moral Philosophy

The U.S. Supreme Court and the Politics of Appointment -- Judge Charles Porter

 

Is the present political stalemate over the President’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court unusual in American history? Does filling the current Supreme Court vacancy really matter?

 

This course will compare the current political battle over the President’s nomination to the Supreme Court with past presidential nominations to the Court.  

 

Throughout U.S. history, Presidents have battled with Congress to fill Supreme Court vacancies, as some Presidents have tried to pack the Court with justices that would be supportive of the President’s agenda.   This course will discuss some of the past battles between the executive and legislative branches of government, including the presidencies of John Quincy Adams, Franklin Roosevelt, and George H. W. Bush, as well as discuss the outcomes of those battles and how they affected the Supreme Court’s rulings.

 

Judge Charles Porter received his B.A. from U.C. Santa Barbara; his J.D. from U.C. Hastings; his L.L.M. from U. of San Diego; and his C.P.A. from U. of Illinois.  He is a retired Municipal Court Judge from Kern County, and a retired ex-officer from U. of San Luis Obispo School of Law, where he taught several courses, including Constitutional Law.  While he was a judge in California, he met all the members of Berger Court personally during visit to Washington, D.C.

 

Tuesday, January 10 2017, 10:00am- 12:00pm   SLO Methodist Church

register for this course: Supreme Court

The M & Ms of The Monarch Butterfly -- Suzy Will

 

 

This is an  introduction to the MIGRATION, METAMORPHASIS, MILKWEED, and MATING of the Monarch Butterfly. Why are they in Pismo Beach? What makes their life cycle so unusual? How can  the wildflower called "milkweed" be the solution to dwindling butterfly populations? Is it really Valentine's Day in the grove ? More than curiosity, this program will enable you to join us in educating the public about this amazing insect.

 

Suzy Will grew up in San Diego county. Her family moved to Morro Bay to attend Cal Poly. She lived for 10 years on the PG&E Buchon Trail. Suzy's interests in biology began here! She taught school in San Luis Obispo for 25 years, then retired and became a State Park volunteer docent in the  Pismo Beach State Park Monarch  Butterfly  Overwintering Site .Suzy also volunteers with 3rd grade Chumash Education. She is a past grove coordinator, a frequent talker at the grove and loves going into 2nd grade classrooms.

 

Friday, January 6 2017, 10:00am- 11:30am   Butterfly Preserve, Pismo Beach

register for this course: Monarch Butterfly

Verdi Does Shakespeare: Macbeth, Othello, Falstaff -- John Frey

Image result for verdi shakespeare

 

At least 23 of Shakespeare's plays have been turned into operas. Among them, all three of the adaptations by Verdi - Macbetto, Otello and Falstaff - have achieved a permanent place in the international repertory. Verdi's love of Shakespeare persisted with ever-growing fervor during his life. By his bedside at his home at Sant' Agata Verdi kept a bookcase which contained two sets of Shakespeare's complete works, both translated into Italian.

 

Verdi is one of the few composers who created solid operatic masterpieces from Shakespeare plays - Macbetto and Otello are great tragedies and Falstaff ( adapted from The  Merry Wives of Windsor) is the last of two comic operas that Verdi composed during his lifetime. These operas not only succeeded at the time of their premieres but have grown in stature over the years, standing out even from Verdi's own impressive line of great works.

 

In this series of six 3-hour presentations you will explore the characteristics of the Verdi adaptations of three of Shakespeare’s plays by viewing videos of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Othello and The Merry Wives of Windsor and of Verdi’s Macbetto, Otello and Falstaff. You will view Lady Macbeth’s famous “Sleepwalking” scene, listen to Desdemona’s wistful “Willow Song” and chuckle at Falstaff’s comeuppance as he is outwitted by the Merry Wives.

 

Each session consists of a 30-minute commentary and discussion as well as a 2.5-hr video for each of the musicals. Your instructor will provide you with a 56-page syllabus that will include (1) an analysis of the plot of each of the works, (2) a synopsis and list of characters, (3) a description of the source material that inspired the works and (4) brief biographies of authors, composers and performers. You will also receive a list of recommended CDs, DVDs and books.

 

 John Frey is a retired Chemistry professor and a member of the boards of LLCC, Festival Mozaic and of Opera Lovers Meet.  He has performed in the chorus of Opera San Luis Obispo and the SLO Master Chorale.  He has had a lifelong love and passion for opera, choral music and musical theater.  He has made numerous commentaries and video presentations for SLO’s Opera Lovers, OperaSLO and LLCC.

 

Thursdays, January 5, 12, 19, 26, February 2 , 9,  2017, 1:00pm- 4:00pm Six Sessions  

Odd Fellows Hall SLO  

register for this course: Verdi/Shakespeare

History of Science -- Dick Jackson

 

Prior to the 17th century original thought had been discouraged, both by custom and by the authorities (churches).

 

However, beginning toward the end of the 1600's great thinkers began to ask and answer fundamental questions about the world we experience. This series of lectures covers the start of what we now call science and goes on to describe the advances made up to the end of the 19thC. If you are fascinated by ideas -- correct, incorrect or just plain wacko, you will enjoy these lectures by an acclaimed professor of history.

 

Part 1 of this series, presented here, will comprise five sessions covering 10 lectures, taking us from around 1700 to the end of the 18th century.  Along the way we will explore such things as the demise of alchemy, the beginnings of biology and medicine, theories about the Earth, and early experiments with electricity.

 

Ample time for discussion will be arranged.

 

Further classes will be arranged in the future to complete the lecture series.

 

Wednesdays, January 4, 11, 18, 25, and February 1 2017, 10:00am- 12:00pm   KCBX in SLP

register for this course: History of Science

Lecture and Virtual Tour of the Mission San Antonio de Padua -- Prof. Robert Hoover

Image result for Mission San Antonio de Padua

Join us for a lecture and a virtual tour of the Mission San Antonio de Padua. 

Prof. Bob Hoover will share his extensive collection of slides of the misson that he has collected over the years. These slides show the exterior, interior, images of art and artifacts and the restoration efforts over the last 30 years.

 

You will learn why establishing missions in California was important to the Spanish crown learn more about the history of the mission period.

 

Your instructor will also discuss many aspects of  of the Mission San Antonio de Padua: its history: its unique architecture; the Mission’s bells; and description of what everyday life was like in the Mission’s community.

 

Finally, you will learn about the decline and abandonment of the Mission and it’s rebirth as a museum, educational facility and retreat center.

 

The Mission is located on Fort Hunter Liggett in southern Monterey County, about an hour and a half north of San Luis Obispo.  The Mission was founded in 1771, and is known for its campanario and archway bells. It has been largely restored to its original condition.

Robert L. Hoover, has a PhD in anthropology with a specialty in California archaeology from UC Berkeley.  He has taught at Stanford and is a professor emeritus at Cal Poly.  He has specialized in Spanish colonial archaeology, serving continuously as director of the Archaeological Field School at Mission San Antonio for over 30 years.  He is a recipient of the Award of Distinction from the California Council for the Promotion of History and has received the Norman Neuerburg and Fermin Lasuen Awards from the California Mission Studies Association.  Dr. Hoover was a member of the State Historical Resources Commission for 18 years.

 

Wednesday, December 7 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   SLO Art Museum Gray Wing.  

register for this course: Virtual Mission Tour

Finding Bulgaria -- Prof. John McKinstry

Maria smiling holding a toddler

Relatively small, geopolitically insignificant, with an underperforming economy, Bulgaria is one of the “sad sacks” of European nations. 

 

But your instructor, John McKinstry, knows something of these people: they live in a beautiful place and they deserve better. Proud, comparatively well educated, Bulgarians through some bad leadership and bad luck weave a 1000-year tapestry of frustration and disappointment.

 

Join Prof. McKinstry for a short encounter with the history, the scenery and  present-day life of this interesting society.

 

John McKinstry is Professor of sociology and Asian Studies at Cal Poly 1968-2014. Recipient of three teaching Fulbright awards. Staff of universities in Tokyo, Fukuoka, Harbin and Sofia, Bulgaria. Author and co-author of several books about Asian societies.

 

Tuesday, December 13. 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   Adult School, Room B3 in SLO.  

register for this course: Finding Bulgaria

 

Reading the December 5, 2016 New Yorker -- Jerry Breaksstone

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Due to popular demand, Jerry Breakstone has agreed to host another session of Reading the New Yorker.  This time participants will be discussing articles from the December 5, 2016 issue of the New Yorker, so the class will be different from the class held in September.

 

For nearly a century The New Yorker has been treating its readers to a weekly feast of cartoons, poetry,  short fiction, and hard-hitting investigative journalism. 

 

Join other LLCC members as we read and discuss the most current issue of The New Yorker, starting with the cartoons.  We’ll then break into small groups to focus on pieces of shared interest, and finally come back together to address the most compelling questions that have emerged.  In the process we’ll have fun getting to know The New Yorker, each other, and ourselves.

 

Jerry Breakstone has participated in numerous Reading the New Yorker classes in the Lifelong Learning Institute program at Washington University in St. Louis, MO.  Previously he was a practicing architect and taught in the Schools of Architecture at Cal Poly and Washington University.  Currently he is a practicing psychotherapist.

 

Thursday, December 15. 2016, 1:00pm- 3:00pm   KCBX in SLO.  

register for this course: Reading the New Yorker

Easy Holiday Dining -- Debbie Duggan

 

 

Famous local chef, Debbie Dugan, invites serious and casual cooks to enter her kitchen, a little bit of Tuscany on the Central Coast, to learn about quick cooking for holiday entertaining.  This class is designed for those alone who need a gentle push to embark on holiday entertaining using fresh, local healthy ingredients to prepare delicious, easy meals.   

 

 

You can relax and enjoy socializing and eating a gourmet meal prepared by an expert chef.  During the class, Debbie will share lots of advice involving nutrition, cooking tips, shopping, where to buy, where to dine and how to get organized to cook and entertain.  Printed recipes are provided.

 

     The menu will include:

 

*Home made marinated variety of olives

 

*Salad of winter pear, pomegranate, organic baby greens and toasted sunflower seeds with honey mustard vinaigrette

 

*Debbie’s  favorite healthy EASY  Chicken Marsala over creamy soft polenta

 

*Coastal Saute of sugar snaps peas, and cherry tomato with fresh basil, garlic, herbs and olive oil

 

*Artisan warm breads with butter

 

*Gooey, sticky toffee warm pudding bars with orange Toffee Sause and a hint of orange

 

 

Recipes are printed in a packet, guests can watch or participate and they enjoy the food that is prepared in front of them.  Questions are answered and guests always have a great time!

 

The cost of this course to members and non-members is $40 for the lunch and lecture.

 

Debbie Duggan has trained in Europe's most prestigious culinary schools, including the Cordon Bleu in Paris and London, La Varenne in Burgundy, France and Avignonesi Culinary Center and Tenuta de Capezzana in the Tuscany region of Italy, the Emilia-Romangna region of Northern Italy, and most recently Southern Italy.

 

Locally, Debbie has guest lectured at Cal Poly Food Science and Nutrition Department, teaching Customs and Cultures in Food, and taught at Allen Hancock Junior College. 

 

Thursday, December 1, 2016, 11:30am - 1:30pm  San Luis Obispo 

The cost of this course is $40, price includes course and lunch.

 

  

register for this course: Easy Holiday Dining

Ten Minute University in Atascadero -- Asta Hamann

 

Here's a fun challenge - join with seven other Lifelong Learners to teach each other any topic in 10 minutes or less.  What's your passion, interest, love, etc.?  Baseball cards?  Cell phones?  Succulents? the Civil War?  Airline travel?  Fossils? Japanese paper folding?  Topics may range from step-by-step procedures, to academic, cultural or even humorous subjects. 
 
Can you distill your favorite topic into 10 minutes?  Then the Ten-Minute University is for you!  The class is limited to the first eight people who register. 
 
We hope the Ten-Minute University will serve as a great way to become acquainted with and learn from fellow LLCC members.  It's also a great brain exercise.  In that spirit, we ask you not to read your presentation, but take time to prepare your lesson.  And no PowerPoint presentations, videos, etc.  - that's way too formal.  Your own props, handouts or notes are O.K.
 
Two hours.  Eight people.  Are you up for it?  This is always loads of fun, whenever we do it. Who knows what we'll learn about - that's the adventure. 
 
This course is free to all.
 

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 10am-12pm   Atascadero

 

  register for this course: 10 Minute University

 

How Humans Learned to Fly -- Bruce Wright

Image result for orville and wilbur wright

 

Orville and Wilbur Wright (my distant cousins) usually get the credit for inventing and flying the first successful  powered and controlled heavier-than-air airplane in 1903. 

 

Most accounts give the impression that they alone had the idea and easily made it a reality. The truth is that their success was built on more than  400 years of research, trial and error, and failed attempts.  

 

People have dreamed of flying since ancient times. About six thousand years ago drawings on tombs in Egypt showed gods that could fly. Leonardo da Vinci, who lived five hundred years ago, was very interested in flight and believed the way to do it was to flap wings as birds do. He drew numerous pictures of flying machines, but never tried to build any.

 

The invention of the steam engine changed everything and contributed to the development of flight. Machines could make products such as new kinds of steel, cloth and metal wire. Inventors used these materials to try and build flying machines. 

 

This course will trace the path from Leonardo de Vinci to Kitty Hawk.

 

Bruce Wright spent over 50 years in the Aerospace Industry, 34 with the Skunk Works (the official alias for Lockheed Martin's Advanced Development Programs/Projects). During that time he participated in the design and development of   31 aircraft and spacecraft. He led the development teams in 19 of those. He is the "father" of the F-22 Raptor, USA's front line stealth fighter. He has taught aircraft design and history of air and space at Cal Poly for the last eight years.  

 

Friday, November 18 2016, 9:30am-12pm   SLO Library Community Rm

register for this course: How Humans Learned to Fly

A Day With Sibelius, Elgar & Chadwick -- Sandy Eastman

 
Sandy Eastman is providing LLCC members with yet another opportunity to attend his pre-concert class and the symphony "No Ties Allowed" dress rehearsal for the San Luis Obispo Symphony concert coming up in October.
 
There is a cost now to attend the Symphony rehearsals. This cost to attend the rehearsal is not included in the price of the course on Brown Paper Tickets. At the PAC, adults  pay $15 and seniors (age 65 and older)  pay $10. The rehearsal is free to children. The tickets for the dress rehearsal will available about a week before the performance   and may be purchased by calling (805) 756-4849 or by visiting the PAC Box office Tuesday-Saturday 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
 
On Saturday, October 8, the Symphony will bring Maestro Jose-Lius Novo and Grammy Award winning cellist Sara Saint' Ambrogio to the Performing Arts Center.  The program begins with Jubillee from Symphonic Sketches by G. W. Chadwick.  Jubilee is the first of four movements inspired by a scene description, much like snapshots in an album, drawings or vignettes.  Maestro Novo collaborates with Sant' Ambrogio on Elgar's Cello Concerto, a contemplative piece written after World War I. The evening's finale is J. Sibelius' Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 43, a full melodic piece and the composer's best-known work that premiered in 1902.  

 

Music Director and conductor of the Binghamton Philharmonic in New York and Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in Maryland, José-Luis Novo began his musical studies at the conservatory of Valladolid—his hometown in Spain, obtaining the degree of Profesor Superior de Violín. He continued his studies at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Brussels, where he earned a First Prize in violin. In 1988, he came to the United States as a Fulbright Scholar, obtaining both Master of Music and Master of Musical Arts Degrees from Yale University

 

Guest Artist Cellist Sara Sant'Ambrogio first leapt to international attention when she was a winner at the Eighth International Tchaikovsky Violoncello Competition in Moscow. Ms. Sant'Ambrogio has appeared as a soloist with such orchestras as Atlanta, the Beijing Philharmonic, Boston Pops, Budapest, Chicago, Dallas, Moscow State Philharmonic, the Prague Chamber Orchestra, the Osaka Century Orchestra (Japan), ), The Royal Philharmonic, St. Louis, San Francisco and Seattle.

 

This course will be in two parts.  In the morning, there will be a lecture about the composers, about the pieces that are to be played in the rehearsal, and about the soloists.   In the afternoon, the class, as a group, attends the dress rehearsal of the performance.  At the dress rehearsal SLO Symphony guest conductor Mr.Novo will speak as he conducts, giving background information, musicology, and notes on harmony.  With his broad knowledge and stage presence, the dress rehearsal should be fairly comprehensive.

 
Saturday, November 12, 2016.  8:30 - 10:30 am. for course, followed by symphony dress rehearsal 11:00 - 1:00 pm.
 
The morning class will be in Senior Center in SLO.  The concert rehearsal will be in the Christopher Cohan Center in the PAC at Cal Poly.
 
Silsby Eastman (Sandy) grew up and spent his working life in the Los Angeles area before moving to Pismo Beach.  He has taught at Cuesta and Allan Hancock Colleges and has been playing bassoon, baritone saxophone, and bridge as often as possible.  After graduating from Occidental College and Indiana University, he studied conducting bassoon with Walter Ritchie and conducting with Lauris Jones and Richard Lert.  He served as a bandsman in the Air Force and taught in San Bernardino, La Canada, Paramount and Agoura Hills.  He is also a former member of the Long Beach Coterie Sinfonique, the Pasadena Community Orchestra and the Topanga Symphony.
 

Saturday, November 12 2016, 8:30am-1pm   SLO Senior Center & the PAC at Cal Poly

register for this course: A Day With Sibelius

What Will Happen To My Stuff -- Janet L. Wallace

 

This course will answer these questions (and others like them): 

 

Who needs an estate plan and what is involved? 

 

What documents are needed? 

 

What are the pitfalls of not having an estate plan?

 

What are the benefits of having a revocable trust in addition to a Will? 

 

Does having a trust help me avoid estate taxes?

 

What is probate and why should it be avoided? 

 

Who takes over if I can no longer manage my assets? 

 

How do I provide for my grandchildren, particularly when I have a spendthrift child?  

 

Can someone change my estate plan without my wishes? 

 

And, what are the dangers of giving my child too much?

 

Janet L. Wallace is an attorney at Adamski Moroski Madden Cumberland & Green LLP, specializing in estate planning and administration. Ms. Wallace also teaches Estate Planning and Administration at Cuesta Community College.  A graduate of UC Davis School of Law, Ms. Wallace was named one of the County’s “Top 20 Under 40” by the San Luis Tribune and received the inaugural “Rising Star” award from the Women Lawyers Association of San Luis Obispo.

 

Wednesday, November 9,  10am-12pm  San Luis Obispo United Methodist Church

register for this course:  What Will Happen to My Stuff

 

Return of the Amateur Philosopher -- Dick Jackson

 

 

Twice in the past LLCC members have met to ratiocinate** on matters relating to our “shared Western values”. Now you are cordially invited to attend yet another discussion in this series to discuss two questions tangential to these values.

 

** It is possible that this is not actually a real word.

 

1. Should all laws be enforced? We hold the rule of law to be one of our tenets. It follows that we should accept that the law should be applied free of the whims of officialdom. Yet some laws are routinely flouted in the U. S. Can we find justification for this?

 

2. What controls, if any, should society/government put on genetic engineering? Recent advances in genetics have made gene splicing much easier. Future progress in this field may allow “designer babies” – that is, tinkering with an offspring's makeup to, say, remove genetic disease, introduce healthy characteristics such as low LDL, make the child tall and strong, and even highly intelligent. How far should we go?

 

This is a discussion class. Thought priming materials will be circulated prior to the meeting.

 

Dick Jackson is English by birth, American by naturalization, and Scotch by absorption. He is, at least in his own mind, a prince among men. Handsome, generous, witty and, of course, modest to a fault. He is no more qualified to lead a philosophical discussion than anyone else but does so out of a sense of duty to the Lifelong Learners and to alleviate boredom.

 

Thursday, November 3,  10am-12pm  Adult School B3 in San Luis Obispo

register for this course:  Amateur Philosopher

Discover the Goddess in You -- Berta Parrish

 

In our everyday lives we forget that there are goddesses, manifestations of the divine feminine, in all of us.  Once accessed, these deep archetypal sources of insight, authenticity, and spirituality can energize us and provide a sense of meaning and self-acceptance. Discover which of the major Western and Eastern goddesses wants to be expressed through you.  Do you need Hecate’s guidance, Kuan Yin’s compassion, Baubo’s humor, or Saraswati’s creativity?

 

The first session will provide an overview of the three mythological phases of a woman’s life as well as information on selected goddesses who inspire and encourage our internal wisdom and external accomplishments. At the second session participants will select a particular goddess to research and share her attributes and the myth/story orally or by showing a statute or poster.  This class will focus on the feminine side of both men and women and, of course, both sexes are welcome to attend.

 

Berta Parrish, Ed.D.,  is a former college professor and frequent OLLI instructor.  Berta  has a strong background in Jungian and Archetypal Psychology.  In addition to writing, she conducts Dream Questing, Elder Tales, Practical Jung, and Conscious Aging workshops.  She is also author of Wise Woman’s Way: A Guide to Growing Older with Purpose and Passion.

 

Tuesdays, October 18 & 25,  10am-12pm  San Luis Obispo United Methodist Church.  Two Sessions

register for this course:  Goddess in You

 

Tour of the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa -- Joe Carotenuti

Mission San Luis Obispo

 

Join us for a lecture and a tour of the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa in downtown San Luis Obispo.  The Mission was founded on September 1, 1772, and continues to serve as a parish church for the many Catholics in the area.

 

 We will learn why establishing missions along the California coastline was important to the Spanish crown, the history of the mission period, and the effect the missions had upon the local Chumash population. Our instructor will also discuss the history of the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, its unique architecture, the Mission’s bells, and the roles of significant church figures, including Father Junipero Serra.

 

The tour will include all of the major areas of the Mission complex, including the garden in which the three original mission bells are displayed. Particular attention will be paid to the paintings and statuary and their symbolism. We will also visit the extraordinary mission museum which contains an extensive collection of early photographs which presents a vivid picture of life in early California.   We will end the tour in the bell tower at 11:45-55.  The stairwell is very low and steep with no handicap access. There are about a dozen or so steps  and the ceiling is quite low.  Those who want to stay beyond the time can then see the ringing of the bells. It is quite loud but this is a rare opportunity so everyone can put their fingers in their ears!!

 

Joe Carotenuti is the City Historian/Archivist for the City of San Luis Obispo. He is a regular contributor to Journal Plus magazine and has written over 125 articles on local history.

 

You can select either October 17 or October 21 to take this tour

 

Pick Either Monday, October 17 or Friday, October 21,  9:30am-11:45am  Mission San Luis Obispo

register for this course:  Tour of the SLO Mission 10/17

register for this course:  Tour of the SLO Mission 10/21

Who needs rain when we’ve got desalination? -- Jeff Szytel and Thomas P. Jones

Image result for desalination

 

Desalination has been receiving a lot of attention as California’s drought conditions continue.  If you are curious about the desalination process and how it is being employed to ease water shortages in California and in other parts of the world, you will enjoy this class.

 

You will learn how the reverse osmosis process is used to reclaim brackish fresh water and to remove salt from seawater.  You’ll learn about desalination economics, recent advances in desalination technology, environmental concerns, andThe  political obstacles that stand in the way of building new desalination plants in California.

  

Your instructors will also take you on a tour of the world-wide use of desalination and show you some of the major projects in Australia, Israel and Dubai.  You will also enjoy a detailed overview of the Huntington Beach, Carlsbad and Santa Barbara projects in California.

 

Finally, you will learn about the status of desalination projects planned or underway in Pismo Beach, Morro Bay and Cambria.

 

Jeff Szytel is the founder and principal of Water Systems Consulting Inc. located in San Luis Obispo.  He is a professional engineer with more than sixteen years of experience in civil and environmental engineering, specializing in water, wastewater and recycled water systems.  His company is involved in some of the major desalination projects on the Central Coast.

 

Thomas P. Jones is the director of Strategic Initiatives at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant.

 

KSBY – Exploring a TV News Station -- Kathleen Choal

 

Are you curious about how a TV station works?   What it takes to get a newscast on the air?     How a news anchor’s scripts are prepared?    How news stories are chosen for airing?    How a weatherperson uses a “green screen” to report the weather?    How social media is impacting TV journalism? How technology has changed and is used today?   

 

You will meet Kathleen Choal, KSBY President and General Manager of the station, who will share  the answers to these questions and share many stories with you.   There will also be a Q&A session where all  participants will have a chance to ask about other subjects of interest.. 

 

After the class, we will be treated to a tour of the station and have a first-hand experience of how it operates.

 

Kathleen Choal is currently the President and General Manager of KSBY-TV (NBC/CW affiliate) in San Luis Obispo. She has held significant positions in TV journalism for over 20 years, most recently as Station Manager of KVOA-TV (NBC affiliate) in Tucson, Arizona, and Managing Editor and Assistant News Director of WGCL-TV (CBS affiliate) in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Thursday, September 15,  10am-12 noon  KSBY in San Luis Obispo

register for this course:  KSBY -- Exploring a TV News Station

Learning to Love Opera Four Puccini Heroines: Mimi, Tosca, Butterfly, Turandot -- John Frey

 

In this series of four presentations you will view video segments of Giacomo Puccini’s (1858-1924)  four most popular operas: La Bohéme, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Turandot   This course will appeal to those of you who have never experienced opera, but wish to learn what it is all about, and to those seasoned opera goers who want to deepen their understanding of the basics of opera performance and drama.

 

Puccini is the last of a line of great Italian opera composers including Monteverdi, Rossini, Bellini, Donizetti and Verdi.  He composed ten operas of which four are among the twelve operas most often performed in the U. S. There are no heroines in all opera that captivate audiences of every generation more than Mimi, Tosca, Cio-Cio-San and Turandot.  The beauty of Puccini's melodies, especially in expressions of love and pathos are second to none, and when our hearts are touched by them, it is an authentic emotion at work.

 

Each session will include a 30-minute commentary and a one-hour video segment from one of the operas.  You will listen to some of Puccini’s most famous melodies such as “Musetta’s Waltz,” “Vissi d’arte,” “Un bel di” and “Nessun dorma.”  The operas will be presented in the original Italian with English subtitles. Course handouts will include an analysis of each opera as well as a description of its story and characters. You will also receive a list of recommended CDs, DVDs and books.

 

John Frey taught chemistry and engaged in chemical research for 40 years and is now retired.  He has served on various boards including OperaSLO, LLCC, Opera Lovers Meet, SLO Master Chorale and Festival Mozaic. He participated in numerous musical events as a member of several choral groups and in 12 productions of Pacific Repertory Opera and OperaSLO. He has organized and taught numerous courses on opera and musical theater. 

 

Fridays, September 9, 23, 30 & October 7 2016, 10:00am- 1:00pm   Congregation Beth David in SLO.  Four Sessions

register for this course: Learning to Love Opera: Puccini

 

 

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration -- Nancy Reinstein, PhD

 

In this course, registered Dietician Nancy Reinstein will provide an overview of Dr. Weston Price’s observations found in his 1939 book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.   In the book, Price claims that various diseases endemic to Western cultures of the 1920s and 1930s – from dental caries to tuberculosis â€“ are rarely present in non-Western cultures.  He argues that as non-Western groups abandoned indigenous diets and adopted Western patterns of living, they showed increases in typical Western diseases. He concludes that Western methods of commercially preparing and storing foods strip away vitamins and minerals necessary to prevent these diseases.

 

Your instructor will elaborate on the ideas put forth by Price--and other groups of researchers that followed him-- showing that modern degenerative disease can be caused by a modern diet.

 

You will not come away from this course thinking that there is one best diet;  rather, we will discuss the characteristics of diets that help us avoid cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and other problems.  Your instructor will use Dr. Weston Price’s observations to demonstrate the principles.  In addition, we’ll explore alternative healing techniques  by using essential natural oils-- that have few side effects-- to improve health and reverse physical, mental and emotional problems.  

 

Nancy Reinstein, PhD ,BA Chemistry, Cornell University; PhD Nutrition Science UC Davis; Registered Dietitian; taught nutrition full-time at Cal Poly for 3 years; worked as the clinical dietitian at FHMC for 4 years; worked for WIC for 3 years; worked for Tri-Counties Regional Center counseling developmentally disabled individuals and group homes; was a full-time Clinical Dietitan at Atascadero State Hospital for 16 years.

 

Thursday, September 22,  10:30am-12 noon  United Methodist Church, Atascadero

register for this course:  Nutrition

Great Discussions 2016 -- Is Health Care a Right or a Privilege? -- Paul Worsham

 

Great Discussions 2016 is a highly participatory course designed for those informed and thoughtful people among us who love to engage in real discussion and respectful debate over issues of the day. This course is a forum for exchanging ideas about international and domestic public affairs and America's place in the world.

 

This one-session course is the second of three sessions of Great Discussions 2016 that will be offered in August, September and October.   LLCC offers this discussion series often. The topics discussed change during the year to coincide with world and domestic events and the interests of the participants.

 

Participants will discuss current international and domestic issues and events and geo-political trends that affect us as citizens of the world and as Americans.  Participation is limited to 28.  You may register for this course each time that it is announced during the year.

 

Great Discussions is modeled after the Foreign Policy Association's Great Decisions program that LLCC offered in the past.  

 

This course is designed to be responsive and flexible to the issues of the world.  Discussions will be active responses to changing circumstances throughout the world. The topic covered during this session of Great Discussions will be:

 

SEPTEMBER 15:  â€œIs Health Care a Right or a Privilege?”

 

While Paul Worsham's education and career focused on consumer electronics marketing, he has a deep and active interest in world affairs and America's place in the world. 

 

Thursday, September 15,  10am-12 noon  Union Bank  SLO

register for this course: Great Discussions-- Health Care

Reading the New Yorker -- Jerry Breakstone

 

For nearly a century The New Yorker has been treating its readers to a weekly feast of cartoons, poetry,  short fiction, and hard-hitting investigative journalism. 

 

Join other LLCC members as we read and discuss the most current issue of The New Yorker, starting with the cartoons.  We’ll then break into small groups to focus on pieces of shared interest, and finally come back together to address the most compelling questions that have emerged.  In the process we’ll have fun getting to know The New Yorker, each other, and ourselves.

 

Jerry Breakstone has participated in numerous Reading the New Yorker classes in the Lifelong Learning Institute program at Washington University in St. Louis, MO.  Previously he was a practicing architect and taught in the Schools of Architecture at Cal Poly and Washington University.  Currently he is a practicing psychotherapist.

 

Thursday, September 8 2016, 1:00pm- 33:00pm   KCBX in SLO.  

register for this course: Reading the New Yorker

Appreciating Sixty Years of visual Arts on the Central Coast -- Crissa Hewitt

Enjoy learning the story of the rich and varied Central Coast visual arts community that has grown here from its grassroots.

 

In the 1950s, a number of arts-minded residents, mostly amateur painters, discovered their mutual needs for community, inspiration, and opportunity to display their work. 

 

Retired Cal Poly Art Professor Chrissa Hewitt will explain how this network of art associations, galleries and festivals began, and how this infrastructure has grown to provide educational and display/sales opportunities throughout the area. There are over 300 local artists here now, representing a large array of disciplines.

.

You will see a slide show preview of the upcoming (October 8-9, 15-16) 18th annual Open Studios Art Tour sponsored by ARTS Obispo.  You’ll be able to see the vast variety of their styles, media, and talent that will be on display in October.   

 

And you will receive a catalog and get tips on how to your personal tour. This year 191 local artists are inviting you to visit their studios and appreciate their work.

 

Crissa Hewitt is a retired Cal Poly Professor of Art and Design. She holds a BA in art (CSU Northridge), specializing in 3D disciplines, and an MFA in Silversmithing (Cranbrook Academy of Art), and has studied marble carving in Italy. For 40 years she has been an active participant in several local arts organizations, has installed many art exhibits, and has exhibited her work locally and nationally. This is her eighth year as an Open Studios participant.

 

Thursday, September 29 2016, 2:00pm- 4:00pm   Steinberg Gallery in SLO.  

register for this course: Visual Arts on the Central Coast

Poetry Reading and Workshop -- David Kann

 

LOF farmpicwinter for web-01

 

There is something about thinking through metaphor and image, sound and rhythm that makes both poetry appreciation and poetry writing so appealing.  Good news then that we have David Kann, Cal Poly English Professor and published poet willing to speak to us about both these subjects. In the first session of this two session course, David will give a reading from his recently published chapbook, The Language of the Farm and speak about appreciating poetry and about the creative process with regard to writing poetry.

 

After you have been exposed to David’s poetry, you may be inspired to try writing for yourself.  In the second session David will do a poetry workshop where he will help you to turn your words and ideas into descriptive and powerful poems. The author will also share writing tips that he uses, and ideas for revising your work.

 

David Kann teaches English and creative writing at Cal Poly.  His daughter is a superb poet.  Attending her readings, Prof. Kann found a lot of the other poets' poetry not very good and said so.  A poet friend of his dared him to do better, so Kann returned to poetry after a long hiatus and found that he felt more like himself when writing than he did most other times. Kann got an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts so that he could get better at poetry.  The time spent working on his MFA  at VCFA was one of the finest experiences of his life.

 

Tuesdays, September 6 & 20 2016, 1:00pm- 3:00pm   KCBX in SLO.  Two Sessions

register for this course: Poetry Reading and Workshop

Gene Future: The Promises and Perils of the New Biology -- Cheryl Powers

 

If you have already registered for the course: "DNA Demystified: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Code of Life and the Genetic Revolution Cheryl Powers" Do not register for this "Gene Future" course because it's the second session of the course that you are registered for.  This course is for people who have not already signed up for the two session course.

 

Did the gene revolution pass you by? Over the past sixty years, we have entered a new era in understanding of how livings things, from microbes to humans, operate at the base level.

 

Attending this couse, you will learn about the most significant developments in the field of gene manipulation and the futuristic possibilities that result from this.

 

The genetic revolution has the potential to gain increasing control over life itself. It already has had an enormous impact on agriculture, medicine, the environment, industry, and the law. We’ll discuss the potential dangers that may be present. We will also discuss the ethical and societal controversies such as GMOs, “designer babies”, genetic testing, and gene therapy that have emerged from this new field in science.  You will be encouraged to do critical thinking about the implications of the genetic revolution.

 

 

Cheryl Powers has a BS in Biology from Cornell University.  She was an award-winning high school biology teacher for 44 years.   She also taught courses in Genetics, did research in molecular genetics at Brookhaven National Lab, and ran a summer biotechnology institute in Montana for high school students.   In retirement she is a docent with the Central Coast State Parks

 

Friday, July  8 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   United Methodist Church, SLO.  register for this course: DNA

Understanding the Middle East Today -- Barry Daniel

 

Foreign policy professor and nuclear arms negotiator Barry Daniel wants to help you understand, from a geopolitical perspective, what led to the Middle East being such a complicated, seemingly unsolvable problem.

 

We’ll discuss, among other things, the Sunni-Shiite split in Islam, the European and Soviet/Russian entries into the area, and the creation of Israel. We'll see how those factors shape the current Middle East.

 

We’ll try to explain why and how the U.S. got so embroiled in the region and speculate a little about some possible futures there. Barry expects a spirited discussion to follow.

 

Barry Daniel is a retired professor of foreign policy who has been an Army officer, a member of the U.S. delegation negotiating nuclear arms reduction with the Soviet Union and a student of terrorism. Educated at Eastern Ky. Univ., Colo. St. Univ. and the University of Denver’s Graduate School of International Studies.

 

Wednesdays, August 24 & 31 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   SLO Adult School Room B3.  Two Sessions

register for this course: Understanding the Middle East

Microbes, antibiotics, and the rise and threat of antibiotic resistance -- Mandy J. Ward, PH.D.

In this series of four short lectures, you will learn what you need to know about  antiboitic resistance and its relationship to antiboitic use, and about  how to be prudent about antibiotic use.

 

Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, but it is often difficult for the layman to determine which type of microbe causes which disease.

 

You'll learn about  the structural and functional differences between viruses, bacteria, and ‘higher’ cells, and the differences between anti-biotics, vaccinnes and alternating therapies.  Then you''ll see the cellular structures targeted by certain groups of antibiotics.

 

There will be time for discussions about the rise of antibiotic resistance and its potential as a threat to public health, and about the use and misuse of antibiotics.

 

Mandy J. Ward  has a Ph.D. in Microbiology, performed research in molecular microbiology at UC Berkeley and Stanford, and taught Microbiology and Environmental Microbiology for 5 years at Johns Hopkins University.

 

Mondays,  August 8, 15, 22 & 29, 2016, 10:00am- 11:30am   KCBX SLO

Four Sessions

register for this course: Microbes & Antibiotics

A Journey Into the Afterlife -- Barbara Lane

rassouli-joyriders

 

Some religions, such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam and many other traditional faiths believe that the soul is eternal.  Others, such as many forms of Hinduism and Buddhism, believe that one’s status in the afterlife is a reward or punishment for their conduct during this life.  Most however, agree that there is an Afterlife or Interlife, a dimension where the soul or spirit goes after the death of the body.   

 

This class is an opportunity for spiritual exploration into realms beyond.  Let past-life researcher Barbara Lane lead you to experience a guided meditation, during which you may meet with your deceased loved ones and spirit guides.  Explore aspects of your multi-dimensional spiritual nature.  Reach out to encounter the Divine peace, love and joy that surpasses understanding.

 

If you would like to read  something about this subject either before or after this class, the instuctor recommends reading Michael Newton, PHD, the author of three best selling books, Journey of Souls: Case Studies of Life Between Lives (1994), Destiny of Souls: New Case Studies of Life Between Lives (2000) and Life Between Lives Hypnotherapy (2004) published by Llewellyn.

 

Barbara Lane, PHD, a current LLCC instructor, is a  past-life researcher who has regressed thousands of people in North America for Edgar Cayce's Association for Research and Enlightenment.  She has written four books, her latest being Celebrity Past-Life Clues. For over a decade,  Ms.Lane was on staff at the George Washington University Hospital Center for Integrative Medicine in Washington, D.C. She; has appeared on the popular television series, Sightings; is a frequent guest on television and radio shows, and has been featured in the Washington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the Village Voice

 

Wednesday, August 3 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm  St. Stephen's Epicopal Church, SLO

register for this course: Journey Into the Afterlife

Great Discussions 2016 -- Should Illicit Drugs Be Legalized (Taxed)?-- Paul Worsham

 

 

Great Discussions 2016 is a highly participatory course designed for those informed and thoughtful people among us who love to engage in real discussion and respectful debate over issues of the day. This course is a forum for exchanging ideas about international and domestic public affairs and America's place in the world.

 

This one-session course is the first of three sessions of Great Discussions 2016 that will be offered in August, September and October.   LLCC offers this discussion series often. The topics discussed change during the year to coincide with world and domestic events and the interests of the participants.

 

Participants will discuss current international and domestic issues and events and geo-political trends that affect us as citizens of the world and as Americans.  Participation is limited to 28.  You may register for this course each time that it is announced during the year.

 

Great Discussions is modeled after the Foreign Policy Association's Great Decisions program that LLCC offered in the past.  

 

This course is designed to be responsive and flexible to the issues of the world.  Discussions will be active responses to changing circumstances throughout the world. The topic covered during this session of Great Discussions will be:

 

OCTOBER 20:  â€œShould Illicit Drugs Be Legalized (Taxed)?”

 

 

Legal sales of Marijuana could hit $6.7 Billion in the in 2016.  However, it is estimated that illegal sales of Marijuana annually is more than $40 Billion, followed by Cocaine sales at about $28 Billion and Heroin at $27 Billion.  Obviously, these kinds of numbers catch the attention of hungry politicians looking for a new tax base to replace declining cigarette sales taxes.


The revenues and profits from the legal sales of Opioids by prescription, is enormous, as are the sales of the private clinics set up to treat addictions to prescription drugs.  Just one of these drugs, OxyContin, legally sells about $3 Billion worth of pills annually and this doesn’t account for the value of illegal sales or the actual cost to consumers.  And there are many more similar opioid “paid killers” like Percocet, Vicodin and Hydrocodone, to name but a few of the formulations and brands.  Should they be legalized?

 

 

While Paul Worsham's education and career focused on consumer electronics marketing, he has a deep and active interest in world affairs and America's place in the world. 

 

Thursday, October 20  10am-12 noon  Union Bank  SLO

register for this course: Great Discussions

Getting to Know the Sound of Rodgers and Hammerstein—John Frey

Image result for rodgers and hammerstein

 

 

Richard Rodgers(1902–1979) and  Oscar Hammerstein II(1895–1960) were an influential, innovative and successful American musical theater writing team. They created a string of popular  Broadway musicals in the 1940's and 1950's, initiating what is considered the "golden age" of musical theatre. Among the many accolades their shows (and film versions) garnered were thirty-four Tony Awards, fifteen  Academy Awards, the Pulitzer Prize and two Grammy Awards. 

 

The course will familiarize you with the scope Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musicals and emphasize the understanding of their plots, lyrics and musical values.

 

In this series of four 3-hour presentations you will view videos of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s most popular Broadway musicals: Oklahoma!, South Pacific, and The Sound of Music. You will listen to such great songs as “People Will Say We're in Love,” “Some Enchanted Evening,” "My Favorite Things" and many more.

 

You will view a PBS documentary entitled Richard Rodgers - The Sweetest Sounds. This video presents a summary of Rodgers’ life and his collaboration with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein. It features songs performed by Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, Julie Andrews, Barbara Streisand, Gordon MacRae, John Coltrane and others. Rodgers composed over 900 songs in 70 shows in a career that spanned seven decades. The video features interviews with Rodgers’ daughters and colleagues.

 

At each session you will watch one of the films, and then participate in a 30-minute commentary and discussion about it. You will receive a 36-page course will syllabus that includes an analysis of the plot of each musical, a synopsis and list of characters, a description of the source material that inspired the musicals, and brief biographies of authors, composers and performers. You will also receive a list of recommended CDs, DVDs and books.

Tuesdays, July 19 & 26, August 2 & 9, 2016, 1:00pm- 4:00pm   United Methodist Church, Atascadero.  Four Sessions

register for this course: Rodgers & Hammerstein

 

Tour of the SLO Sheriff’s Department Crime Lab Led by Crime Lab Personnel

 

LLCC and the Sheriff’s Office are going to provide a tour of the County’s Forensic Laboratories.  Your tour will be led by five of the Crime Laboratory personnel.  You will see much of the equipment and learn of this Laboratory’s capabilities.  


The Sheriff's Office Crime Laboratory has four sections: Forensic Blood-Alcohol Laboratory, Chemistry and Toxicology Laboratory, Crime Scene Investigation and CAL-ID Management.  

 

The Forensic Blood-Alcohol Laboratory performs analysis on approximately 1800 samples annually from driving under the influence (DUI) cases.  The Chemistry and Toxicology Laboratory analyzes approximately 2000 samples annually to determine what drugs a person has taken or the type of an unknown pharmacological.  Forensic Specialists respond to crime scenes to document and collect evidence. 

 

Evidence is received from the Sheriff’s office, all Police Departments in the county, and from other outside agencies (State Parks, Fish and Wildlife, Cal Poly, Cuesta College, etc.)  This evidence is processed in order to establish a link between individuals, or between an individual and a scene or event. 

  

The Cal-ID Program for the county manages identification and biometric programs.  It operates the county’s Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and Livescan.  Expert testimony on the results of the work is provided in Juvenile and Superior Courts and before the Grand Jury.

 

This class is limited in size to the first 30 who register.  You will be part of one of four or five smaller groups that will each be assigned to a different aspect of the Crime Laboratory.  Your group will rotate  through all of the presentations.

 

Please bring no food or drink.  Closed toed shoes are mandatory.  Seating is very limitied,  so you need to be able to stand for an extended period of time. 

 

Please note that this course may be cancelled (or postponed) if there is an incident to which the lab personnel must respond.

 

Wednesday, July 20 2016, 10:15am- 12:30pm  You must arrive on time. SLO Sheriff's Office 1585 Kansas Ave.

register for this course: Crime Lab

Present Moment Meditation – Josephine Laing

Meditation is a gateway to peace of mind. In this meditation class, you will learn a simple technique that your instructor has developed for helping you remain in the present moment during meditation.  This is achieved by engaging the right side of our brains. 

 

We live in a left brain dominant culture.  The half of our brain that is located in the left side of our heads holds the perception of the analytical, linear, sequential and time-bound aspects of our reality. In this part of our brain, our thoughts are filled with language and numbers, worries about the past and fears of the future. Our left brains like established routines and well-known solutions to our problems.

 

The thoughts in our right brain are much wider in scope. Our right brain thinks in terms of the whole forest rather than just the tree. The knowledge held in our right brains is way more astute in many ways, not only socially and emotionally but also psychically, being able to see the entire context, like the whole shoreline instead of just one grain of sand.

 

Once you learn how to use this simple tool you can receive insights, solutions and guidance for your life.  Please join Josephine for a delightful morning spent going deep into the moment.

 

Josephine Laing has been teaching classes in spiritual studies, bringing self-empowerment to individuals wishing to explore deeper aspects of themselves for over 25 years.  Ms. Laing holds a Bachelor of Science degree with high honors in Horticulture and is a lifelong organic gardener and herbologist.  She has a weekly on-line international radio show called Step Into Magic on deepening spirituality, developing inner guidance and embracing purpose in our lives.

 

Wednesday, July 6 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   SLO Adult School

register for this course: Meditation

DNA Demystified: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Code of Life and the Genetic Revolution– Cheryl Powers

Image result for dna

 

Did the gene revolution pass you by? Over the past sixty years, we have entered a new era in understanding of how livings things, from microbes to humans, operate at the base level.

 

This is a two-session course.  At the first session, we will explore the fundamentals of DNA - the code of life - and learn how genes make proteins. Building on an introductory Power Point presentation, we will use simple experiments employing everyday materials such as Ziploc bags, strawberries, shampoo and alcohol to extract and spool DNA.  All materials will be provided.

 

You should carry away an improved understanding of the structure and function of DNA and, as a bonus, be able to take some strawberry DNA to keep!

 

At the second session, you will learn about the most significant developments in the field of gene manipulation and the futuristic possibilities that result from this.

 

The genetic revolution has the potential to gain increasing control over life itself. It already has had an enormous impact on agriculture, medicine, the environment, industry, and the law. We’ll discuss the potential dangers that may be present. We will also discuss the ethical and societal controversies such as GMOs, “designer babies”, genetic testing, and gene therapy that have emerged from this new field in science.  You will be encouraged to do critical thinking about the implications of the genetic revolution.

 

 

Cheryl Powers has a BS in Biology from Cornell University.  She was an award-winning high school biology teacher for 44 years.   She also taught courses in Genetics, did research in molecular genetics at Brookhaven National Lab, and ran a summer biotechnology institute in Montana for high school students.   In retirement she is a docent with the Central Coast State Parks

 

Fridays, July 1 & 8 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   United Methodist Church, SLO.  Two Sessions

register for this course: DNA

Behind the Paper Screen. A Glimpse of Some Unique Ways Japan Has Blended Historical Themes With a Thoroughly Modern Life Style -- Prof. John McKinstry

japanese culture facts

 

Japan is one of the twenty odd nations in the world classified as “developed.” All these fortunate societies benefit from a relative high standard of living, representative democracy, professional and independent media and an effective education system open to a broad sector of the population.

 

In many ways Japan shares a great deal in terms of everyday life with the United States. However when we delve beneath the surface, we discover a culture that combines deep historical themes with a completely unique version of modern life.

 

Resource poor and crammed into limited space, Japan has through cleverness and adaptation created an eminently successful social system.

 

Differences in attitudes about family, work, traditions, individualism, and other life factors will be under discussion.

 

Attend this course and you'll come away with an appreciation of how a society can at once be so similar and yet so fundamentally different from our own, addressing familiar issues in a totally unique way.

 

John McKinstry, Professorof sociology and Asian studies at Cal Poly 1968-2014. Recipient of three teaching Fulbright Awards. Staff of universities in Tokyo, Fukuoka. Harbin and Sofia, Bulgaria. Author and co-author of several books about Asian societies. Prof. McKinstry has taught several LLCC courses related to Japan.

 

Tuesday, June 28 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   Copeland Auditorium, French Hospital, SLO

register for this course: Behind the Paper Screen

Iron Horse and Iron Men -- Joseph Carotenuti & Marilyn Darnell

 

When you ride or see a train…or hear its whistle…do youl remember that “progress” is the result of personal dedication and commitment to the future by the people who created the railroad?

 

The railroad was (and is) a major accomplishment in American history.


In the late 1800’s the Iron Horse was seen as THE symbol of progress.  Two remarkable men, Chauncy Hatch Phillips and Robert Edgar Jack, were instrumental in bringing the railroad down the Central Coast and into San Luis Obispo. Our presenters will discuss how their vision, tenacity and sense of community motivated them to overcome the political and financial obstacles to making their vision a reality.  Hear about the seemingly unsurmountable obstacles and ultimate triumphs.



The RR Museum will open at 9:30 for those who want to wander around the Museum before the class starts at 10.

 

Joseph A. Carotenuti is the City Historian/Archivist for San Luis Obispo and frequent contributor to Journal Plus magazine. Longtime San Luis Obispo resident and historian Marilyn Darnell’s new book “Anything but Dull - The Personal Letters of R.E. Jack” provides an overview of the life of R. E. Jack.

 

Thursday, June 16 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   Railroad Museum, SLO

register for this course: Iron Horse & Iron Men

Crafting Olive Oil on the Central Coast -- Karen Tallent

 
 Come spend an afternoon in an olive grove and learn all about the production of olive oil. We will take a tour of an olive orchard and see the process at the facility on how the oil is actually made. You will learn about planting, cultivating and harvesting to milling, bottling and selling. 
 

 The Olive Grove owner, Karen Tallent, will tell you about the business cycle and local economics, the roller coaster ups and downs of farming & the marketplace.  You'll come to find out why these Central Coast farmers have found a wonderful niche for their award winning products. This is an interactive session that will involve tasting, pairing and lots of questions & answers.   You''ll start with a presentation at the barn with some oil tasting. That will be followed by a catered lunch at noon with oil experimenting inside the barn, a tour of the farm, and then, finally,  dessert and lingering back at the barn.  Your choices for the lunch  are:

 
1)      Roast Turkey w/Cranberry Aioli
Fresh Roast Turkey, Sharp Cheddar Cheese, Fresh Field Greens & tomato
 Served on Focaccia Bread with Stein's Cranberry Aioli
 
2)      Roast Beef & Sharp Cheddar
Fresh Sliced Roast Beef, Sharp Cheddar, Tomato & Red Onion with Field Greens
Creamy Horseradish Spread served on Ciabatta Bread
 
3)      Vegetarian choice:  Nancy's Salad
Fresh Field Greens, Candied Walnuts, Feta Cheese, Dried Cranberries
With Raspberry Vinaigrette on the side
 
All sandwiches include:
Stein's Pasta Salad, Fresh Fruit & Deli pickle
Stein's Famous Wine Brownie
Sparkling Water
 
Please select your entree by buying a corresponding ticket
for that entree on Brown Paper Tickets.
 
Karen Tallent, owner of the Olive Grove says: "Our motivation is not primarily olive oil sales, but olive oil education, which is why we sign up every year to participate in the "Great Ag Adventure" in the Fall at the fairgrounds. Our audiences for these six 20-minute sessions are groups of 4th grade students bused in from all over the county to learn about farming and ranching for the day. They hardly have purchasing power but will better understand where olive oil comes from! We also participated again in the Mid State Fair for fours days this year." 
 
Wednesday, June 15, 10am-1pm  The Groves on 41 in Templeton
 
Cost is $17 for LLCC members and $22 for non-members (includes lunch, tax & tip)
 

Wednesday, June 15 2016, 10:30am- 1:30pm   The Groves Rt. 41 in Templeton.

register for this course: Crafting Olive Oil on the Central Coast

The CIA – Why Does It Exist? -- Odell Lee

Odell Lee

 

Why do the US and other nations need intelligence services? What is the mission of the CIA?  

 

Answers to these questions will be illustrated by some of former CIA agent Odell Lee’s personal experiences as a case officer and as one of the first African-Americans hired by the CIA for deep cover operations

.

Ample time will be provided to answer questions from class attendees.

 

Odell Lee retired from the CIA after 25 years of service.  He attended undergraduate school at UCLA and graduate schools at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and the Institute of Political Studies, Paris, Frane.  He is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow and author of “The Formative Years of an African-American Spy – A Memoir (2012)

 

Monday, June 13 2016, 10:00am- 12:00pm   Adult School H3 SLO

register for this course: The CIA: Why Does it Exist?

Julius Caesar -- the Play -- George Frisch

Image result for julius caesar play

 

Let Shakespearean scholar George Frisch guide you as we visit in depth a drama Shakespeare painted on historical canvas as his audience might have understood it - the Tragedy of Julius Caesar. 

 

Ambition – Power – Political Intrigue.  Is this America 2016? 

 

No, Rome, 44 BC.   Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tells of a tale of seduced idealism in an age of power and politics; a tale of unforeseen and bloody consequences that flow from the streets of Rome to the far corners of the Roman Empire and change the course of Western history forever.

 

Shakespeare’s dramatic insights into the characters who people the play leave us thinking how relevant those insights may still be today.  This course will be a study of those characters.

 

George Frisch is a retired securities lawyer and former associate professor of law with a lifelong interest in Shakespeare. He has taught several LLCC and OLLI courses about Shakespeare's plays and sonnets
 

Tuesday, June 7 2016, 1:00pm- 3:00pm   Copeland Auditorium, French Hospital, SLO

register for this course: Julius Caesar

 

What You Should know about the seafood you eat -- The Good, the bad, and the ugly -- Steve Hendricks

 

What  are the best fish and shellfish you can eat that benefits both you and the planet? There are choices you can make and Cuesta College biology instructor Steve Hendricks will share with you the information you need to make intelligent choices. 

 

You will learn about how seafood is harvested or farmed; learn which seafood is healthy/unhealthy for you; and learn how seafood is imported from other countries and where it is sold here. 

 

Mr. Hendricks  will describe  various commercial fishing methods, including fish farming, and their impacts on the marine environment. The information you receive will empower you to make healthy seafood choices that also help sustain the world’s fisheries and the marine environment.

 

Steve Hendricks grew up on the Central Coast. He holds a B.S. in Fish Biology from Humboldt State, an M.S. in Fish Biology from Oregon State, and worked for more than a decade as a fish biologist in California, Alaska, Oregon and Idaho. For the past 10 years he has taught biology at Cuesta and Hancock Colleges. Steve is an avid fisherman who is very concerned about the future health of our oceans.

 

Monday, May 23 2016, 1:00pm- 3:00pm   St. Peter's By The Sea, Morro Bay

register for this course: What You Should Know About Seafood

Estrella Warbirds Museum Tour -- Docent Led

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For all aviation and military buffs, the Estrella Warbirds Museum is a must-see. With two dozen aircraft on display, the museum also has missiles, tanks, and other military vehicles and machinery, as well as military artifacts and paraphernalia and civilian artifacts kept by Civilians and military personnel during the wars.

 

Located on the southern end of the Paso Robles airport property, the museum is one of few “fly-in” or “drive-in” facilities in the country. The museum’s primary goal is to “preserve, perpetuate and display American aviation history, especially that of our nation’s military services.” While the museum does not own flyable aircraft, many of the museum members own flyable WWII aircraft that are on display.

 

During this two-hour docent-led outside walking tour you will see the military planes and equipment preserved from previous wars.  The museum always has something going on and has thematic displays that change at regular intervals throughout the year, so if you have visited before, you will be sure to see something new. After the tour, it's time for lunch.  We encourage you to bring your own water and a sack lunch to enjoy at one of the picnic tables scattered throughout the grounds.  Cost for the tour for LLCC members is $13 including admission to the museum.  Non-members are welcome to register for this course at a cost of $18.

 

After the tour, you may want to try out the museum’s real-life FA/18 Hornet Flight Simulator. It will be reserved for those of you who want to do this after the tour. The simulator is for both pilots and non-pilots and simulates real time flight in the cockpit of an FA/18. The cost for the simulator experience is $20 per half hour, and, if interested, you will pay for this experience at the museum.  Groups of three may share this treat, or you may 'be a pilot' for the entire half hour.

 

Friday, May 20 2016, 10:00am-12:00pm   Paso Robles

$13 for members, $18 for non-members.  Price does not include simulator.

Fair Warning -- Tickets Must Be Purchased by May 13

register for this course: Estrella Warbirds Museum Tour

Getting to Know the Sounds of Rodgers & Hammerstein -- John Frey

 

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Richard Rodgers(1902–1979) and  Oscar Hammerstein II(1895–1960) were an influential, innovative and successful American musical theater writing team. They created a string of popular  Broadway musicals in the 1940's and 1950's, initiating what is considered the "golden age" of musical theatre. Among the many accolades their shows (and film versions) garnered were thirty-four Tony Awards, fifteen  Academy Awards, the Pulitzer Prize and two Grammy Awards. 

 

The course will familiarize you with the scope Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musicals and emphasize the understanding of their plots, lyrics and musical values.

 

In this series of four 3-hour presentations you will view videos of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s most popular Broadway musicals: Oklahoma!, South Pacific, and The Sound of Music. You will listen to such great songs as “People Will Say We're in Love,” “Some Enchanted Evening,” "My Favorite Things" and many more.

 

You will view a PBS documentary entitled Richard Rodgers - The Sweetest Sounds. This video presents a summary of Rodgers’ life and his collaboration with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein. It features songs performed by Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, Julie Andrews, Barbara Streisand, Gordon MacRae, John Coltrane and others. Rodgers composed over 900 songs in 70 shows in a career that spanned seven decades. The video features interviews with Rodgers’ daughters and colleagues.

 

At each session you will watch one of the films, and then participate in a 30-minute commentary and discussion about it. You will receive a 36-page course will syllabus that includes an analysis of the plot of each musical, a synopsis and list of characters, a description of the source material that inspired the musicals, and brief biographies of authors, composers and performers. You will also receive a list of recommended CDs, DVDs and books.

 

Tuesdays, July 19 & 26, August 2 & 9, 2016, 1:00pm- 4:00pm   United Methodist Church, Atascadero.  Four Sessions

register for this course: Rodgers & Hammerstein

Bittersweet: How Sugar Shaped the Modern World -- Dick Miller

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The subject of this course is a highly addictive, water soluble crystalline powder derived from plant sap.

 

Over the centuries it has built and toppled empires, energized global commerce, driven human trafficking, and compromised human health. No, it isn’t cocaine, although the similarities are striking. It’s sugar.

 

Sugar has shaped economies, ecosystems, political systems, cultures, cuisines, even our terms of praise and endearment. Its story connects the dots between Islam and the West, The Industrial and American revolutions, Napoleon, Capt. Crunch, and NAFTA, Wedgwood china, diabetes, and the March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

 

This two-hour, two-session lecture/discussion course will trace the history and consequences of sugar from Indonesia to Betteravia Road. Topics will include Sugar and Slaves, How We Got Hooked, The Language of Sweetness, Big Sugar in the Global Economy, and How Your Sweet Tooth Makes You Vulnerable.

 

Two Sessions

 

Mondays, May 9 & 16 2016, 10:00am-12:00pm  United Methodist Church SLO

register for this course:  Bittersweet Sugar

A Day With Rossini, Lalo & Beethoven-- Sandy Eastman

 
Sandy Eastman is providing LLCC members with yet another opportunity to attend his pre-concert class and the symphony "No Ties Allowed" dress rehearsal for the San Luis Obispo Symphony concert coming up in October.
 
There is a cost now to attend the Symphony rehearsals. This cost to attend the rehearsal is not included in the price of the course on Brown Paper Tickets. At the PAC, adults must pay $15 and seniors (age 65 and older) must pay $10. The rehearsal is free to children. The tickets for the dress rehearsal will available about a week before the performance  and may be purchased by calling (805) 756-4849 or by visiting the PAC Box office Tuesday-Saturday 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
 
On Saturday, October 8, the Symphony will perform  
 
Rossini: Overture to The Barber of Seville
Lalo: Symphonie espagnole for Violin and Orchestra with Giora Schmidt
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor
 
Guest Conductor Andrew Sewell  has enjoyed fifteen seasons as Music Director of the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra in Madison.
 

Guest Artist Violinist Giora Schmidt is quickly establishing himself as a virtuoso of the grand tradition with a distinctive voice. His performances are illuminated by a richness of color and effortless technique making Giora one of the most commanding young artists on the stage today.

He has appeared with numerous symphony orchestras around the globe including, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Chicago, Detroit, New Jersey, Fort Worth, Honolulu, San Diego, Vancouver, Toronto, National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba, Orquesta Filarmónica de la UNAM (Mexico City), Orquesta Sinfonica de Chile, Sendai Philharmonic and the Israel Philharmonic.

 
This course will be in two parts.  In the morning, there will be a lecture about the composers, about the pieces that are to be played in the rehearsal, and about the soloists.   In the afternoon, the class, as a group, attends the dress rehearsal of the performance.  At the dress rehearsal SLO Symphony guest conductor Mr. Sewell will speak as he conducts, giving background information, musicology, and notes on harmony.  With his broad knowledge and stage presence, the dress rehearsal should be fairly comprehensive.
 
Saturday, October 8, 2016.  8:30 - 10:30 am. for course, followed by symphony dress rehearsal 11:00 - 1:00 pm.
 
The morning class will be in Senior Center in SLO.  The concert rehearsal will be in the Christopher Cohan Center in the PAC at Cal Poly.
 
Silsby Eastman (Sandy) grew up and spent his working life in the Los Angeles area before moving to Pismo Beach.  He has taught at Cuesta and Allan Hancock Colleges and has been playing bassoon, baritone saxophone, and bridge as often as possible.  After graduating from Occidental College and Indiana University, he studied conducting bassoon with Walter Ritchie and conducting with Lauris Jones and Richard Lert.  He served as a bandsman in the Air Force and taught in San Bernardino, La Canada, Paramount and Agoura Hills.  He is also a former member of the Long Beach Coterie Sinfonique, the Pasadena Community Orchestra and the Topanga Symphony.
 

Saturday, October 8, 2016, 8:30am-1pm   SLO Senior Center Room & the PAC at Cal Poly

register for this course: A Day With Rossini

Brain Gym -- Nisa KIng

 

Passionate life coach Nisa King will lead you through a series of physical exercises that will help you develop your brain’s neural pathways to improve your personal motivation, attention, and performance.

 

These exercises should help your brain to integrate the attention, emotional, and information areas and to become more creative, peaceful, and productive. You may achieve a greater sense of well-being and optimism in meeting your challenges and goals.

 

You will find each movement to be gentle and simple, with no need for any equipment.

.

A simple example exercise you will do is to cross your ankles and cross your arms.  This will reset your brain circuit and slow down your brain wave from Beta to Alpha.  Another of the exercises you will do will relax the Iliopsoas muscle group. These muscles tighten in response to excessive sitting or to stress in the pelvic area, and have the effect of restricting movement and flexibility.  Nisa will show you many more re-patterning exercises that you can do to help to reprogram your nervous system, spinal muscles, and various systems so they can work together optimally.

 

Please remember to wear comfortable clothes and shoes.

 

Friday, May 6 2016, 10:30am-12:00pm   IOOF Historic Hall, Arroyo Grande

register for this course:  Brain Gym

Leaning Pine Arboretum Tour - Christopher Lee Wassenberg

Join the manager of Leaning Pine Arboretum, Chris Wassenberg, for a whirlwind tour-- an exploration of the plants of the world's five Mediterranean climate regions -- without leaving SLO County.

 
Your tour will include the gardens that focus on the world's five Mediterranean climate regions: Australia, California, Chile, the Mediterranean basin, and South Africa. Additionally you will visit the Entry garden, the New Zealand garden, the Dwarf and Unusual Conifer garden, the Formal garden, the Primitive garden, and the Palm and Aloe garden. Featuring a varied assortment of trees, shrubs, and other landscape plants, each garden is unique while continuing the cohesive experience of the entire arboretum. 
 
Located at the Environmental Horticultural Science facility on the Cal Poly campus, the arboretum is an outdoor living laboratory displaying a vast array of beautiful and interesting landscape plants. The five acre arboretum is in a quiet setting with stunning vistas overlooking the campus and the nearby Santa Lucia mountains. Eleven gardens within the arboretum feature a diverse array of trees, shrubs, and other landscape plants appropriate for California's Central Coast area.  
 
You will need to buy a $5 Cal Poly parking permit for this course.
 
From Hwy. 1 take Highland Drive to Via Carta, turn left to top of hill.
Look for the Environmental Horticultural Science sign on right,  park on left.
Arboretum is a short walk beyond greenhouses.
Or enter campus on Grand Avenue, take North  turn Perimeter Rd., right on University Dr., then right on Highland Dr. and  follow directions above.
 

Tuesday, May 3 2016, 10:00am-11:30m   Leaning Pine Arboretum SLO

register for this course:  Leaning Pine Arboretum

 
 

Mastering the Art of Photography in a Smartphone World -- Kelly Donohue

 

 

If you’d like to take incredible photos with the only camera that you have in your pocket at all time -- If bulky photography gear and complex photo editing software are standing in the way of your creativity -- If you have been taking photos with your phone and can’t figure out how to capture anything more than simple snapshots, then this short course is for you.  You will learn to:

 

·         Create a Strong Composition

·         Manually control the phone on your camera

·         Learn how to edit to recreate the feelings you felt when you first saw the scene.

·         Do Macro Photography on a budget.

·         Take perfect portraits in any lighting situation.

·         Be able to handle night time and concerts in tricky dark settings  

-          Edit them to look even better.

·         Share your food photos that’ll cause your friends’ mouths to water.

·         Shoot landscapes that recreate the emotion of the experience to share with others.

·         Create panoramas that don’t just look beautiful but tell a story.

 

Kelly Donohue is the owner and lead photographer for K.Donohue Photography and Design, a 3 year old San Luis Obispo based company. She studied at Cal Poly, with a major in Psychology and a minor in Graphic Design. She is currently also working at Wilshire Health and Community Services as their Marketing and Design staff member.

 

Monday, April 18 2016, 10am-12pm   Adult School B3  SLO

register for this course:  Smartphone Photography

Vision & Aging -- How Our Eyes Change Over Time -- Dr. Steven Sage Hider

 

Our eyes age along with the rest of our bodies. 

 

Common age-related vision problems include cataract formation, glaucoma and macular degeneration. We need authoritative information to help us in our efforts to protect our eyes and prevent vision loss.

 

This course will provide you with information about what symptoms you should watch for in relation to your eyes.  You will also hear about and discuss possible diagnoses and current treatments for those symptoms.

 

A lecture, Power Point visuals and handouts will give you up-to-date medical information.  That will set the stage for a lively Q & A. 

 

The goal of the course is to help you better understand the differences between normal and abnormal changes in your eyesight and alert you to those symptoms that should be matters of concern.

 

Dr. Steven Sage Hider has a Doctorate of Optometry from UC Berkeley  (1994)  He has had a private practice for 21 years, and is certified in therapeutic and glaucoma practice as well as Board Certified.

 

Thursday, April 28 2016, 1:30pm-3:30pm   United Methodist Church, Atascadero

register for this course:  Vision & Aging

Practical Jung -- Berta Parrish

 

 

 

Carl Jung has been called a Western Shaman because of hisexplorations into states of consciousness. Many of his concepts, including collective unconsciousness, projection, archetypes, and synchronicity, are familiar words in our everyday vocabularies.

 

 This class will help you apply these psychological insights to the challenges we all face in the second half of life.

 

During the first session, a Power Point presentation, drawing and writing exercises, and shared personal experiences will help you...:

     *        Differentiate between the conscious and the unconscious.

*        Understand the three types of projection.

*        Recognize shadow issues when they arise in projection.

*        Identify a few major archetypal energies in their lives.

 

During the second session, a Power Point presentation, a guided imagery exercise, and shared personal experiences, will help you to...

     *        Identify a time when the Trickster archetype entered their lives.

*        Appreciate the power of symbols to heal and to guide.

*        Dialogue with a symbol or image that is meaningful to them.

*        Discuss synchronicity and share an example of it in their lives. 

*        Further experiment with a few of the Jungian practices presented.

 

Berta Parrish, Ed.D., former college professor and frequent OLLI instructor, has a strong background in Jungian and Archetypal Psychology.  In addition to writing, she conducts Dream Questing, Elder Tales, Discover the Goddess in You, and Wise Woman workshops.  She is also author of Wise Woman’s Way: A Guide to Growing Older with Purpose and Passion.

 

Thursdays,  April 21, 28, 10am - 12noon, United Methodist Church, SLO

 Two Sessions

register for this course: Practical Jung

We All Scream for Ice Cream -- Greg Steinberger

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Doc Burnstein’s Ice Cream Lab features hand-crafted, super-premium ice cream presented in glass dishware in the only nostalgic ice cream parlor on the Central Coast.

 

In this delicious environment you will enjoy a conversation with Greg Steinberger, the founder and CEO of Doc  Burnstein's Ice Cream Lab, Inc. 

 

You will experience the innovative  â€Ice Cream Lab Show"  and listen to Doc Burnstein's own version of the amazing history of ice cream and the cast of characters and places instrumental to creating this yummy treat.

 

 Greg will also explain Doc Burnstein's use of a community stock offering that diversifies ownership throughout the nearby area.  He will describe the steps the business has taken to become a California Beneficial Corporation.  He will tell you about the people who benefit from this Corporation.

 

After viewing the show you will tour the ice cream-making facility.  With your creativity and gastronomic juices flowing, you and your fellow course-mates will create, name and eat your own one-of-a kind ice cream.

 

Greg Steinberger graduated from the University of Wisconsin Naval ROTC in 1986, then served 8 years as a Naval Flight Officer.  He completed an evening MBA program at the University of California, Berkeley in 1994 as he completed his military service, and worked in Human Resources for corporations in the S.F. Bay area until moving to Arroyo Grande in 2002.  He founded Doc Burnstein's in 2003, with the assistance of Chuck Burns, Founder of Burnardo'z Ice Cream. 

 

The cost is $15 per person for the presentation, tour and ice cream.  

 

 

Choice of two dates:

Thursday, April 7 2016, 10am-11:30am   Doc Burnstein's Ice Cream Parlor, Arroyo Grande

Wednesday, April 27,2016, 10am-11:30am   Doc Burnstein's Ice Cream Parlor, Arroyo Grande

register for this course:  Doc Burnstein's 

For April 27, click on the arrow next to April 7 on Brown Paper Tickets

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